Getting Started with Pressbooks at TCC

Getting Started with Pressbooks at TCC

A Guide for Faculty from the TCC Library OER Team

TCC's Library OER Team

Contents

1

Welcome!

Hi there! We’re glad you’re interested in creating OER through our Pressbooks platform. This book will cover a few of the ins and outs of OER, including copyright and licensing issues, as well as how to get started using Pressbooks. We want to ensure consistency and quality across all of Tulsa Comm

The OER TCC Library team!

unity College’s OER textbooks and materials.

Let us introduce ourselves as the authors of this book and as your main points of contact for using and creating OER. Send any questions our way!

 

Continue on to the next chapters to begin the process of setting up your Pressbooks account.

 

 

 

2

About This Book

How to Move Around This Book

Use the arrows at the bottom left and right of each page to move forward and backward through the modules. Or, use the Contents menu in the top left hand corner to go to a particular section.

Download

If you would prefer to download a PDF copy of this book, or if you prefer to read it on another eBook platform, here are some options:

The following formats are for those who wish to create an adaptation of this Open Educational Resource:

Files for download can be found on this book’s home page, just under the cover image.

Find a Mistake?

Every effort has been made to ensure this text is accurate and free of mistakes. If you find an error, including broken links, please notify us at OERLibrarian@tulsacc.edu.

License Information:

This book, Using Pressbooks @ TCC, was adapted for Tulsa Community College from the following open sources:

Suggested attribution:

Using Pressbooks @ TCC, by Tulsa Community College OER Librarians, available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

I

Getting Set Up

The first part of the book will provide a brief overview of the following topics, which will prepare you to get started using Pressbooks to create your own OER:

  • What is Pressbooks?
  • What is OER?
  • What is Open Licensing?

Part One ends with a statement of understanding regarding copyright and appropriate use of this platform.

 

1

What Is Pressbooks?

What is Pressbooks?

This website you’re reading right now IS a book built in Pressbooks.  It’s one example of how you can combine openly licensed material from multiple sources and add your own original content to create something new and completely customized for students in your courses.

The short (3:18) video below goes into a bit more detail and invites you to think about how you might use it.

Pressbooks Feature Alert!

  • The video below shows an example of using an H5P integration to enhance embedded video with interactivity!
  • The term H5P directly above shows an example of using the glossary feature within Pressbooks

 

An interactive H5P element has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view it online here:
https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=21#h5p-5

 

2

What is OER?

Learning Objectives

This chapter will support learners in being able to: 

  • Define Open Educational Resources (OER)
  • Describe the 5R permissions
  • Identify examples of OER types
  • Recognize the role open licensing plays in OER

Introductory Video: What is OER?

One or more interactive elements has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view them online here: https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=62#oembed-2

 

What are Open Educational Resources (OER)?

The nonprofit organization Creative Commons  provides the following definition of open educational resources (OER):

“Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research materials that are either (a) in the public domain or (b) licensed in a manner that provides everyone with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities.”

The key distinguishing factor of this type of educational resource is the copyright status of the material. If course content is under a traditional, all-rights-reserved copyright, then it’s not an OER. If it resides in the public domain or has been licensed for adaptation and distribution, then it is an OER.

The 5 Rs of OER

You just viewed the introductory video where the presenters discussed how the 5Rs are critical in defining and distinguishing open educational resources from other types of learning materials. These 5R permissions are what make OER different from material which is copyrighted under traditional, all-rights-reserved copyright.  Another way to frame this is that open in open educational resources doesn’t simply equate to being free; in fact, it more accurately can be described as:

 

open = free + permissions (the 5Rs)

The 5Rs

The 5Rs are a useful way to appreciate the value of OER. These permissions help you, the user of openly licensed content, understand what you are allowed to do with the work. These permissions are granted in advance and are legally established through Public Domain or Creative Commons license:

  • Revise – the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)
  • Remix – the right to combine the original or revised content with other material to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)
  • Reuse – the right to use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video)
  • Retain – the right to make, own, and control copies of the content (e.g., download, duplicate, store, and manage)
  • Redistribute – the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)

Examples of OER Stakeholder Involvement

As you learned from the video and from the definitions above, OER can encompass a variety of teaching and learning materials. Types of OER include (but are not limited to) syllabi, lesson plans, learning modules, lab experiments, simulations, course videos, discussion prompts, assignments, assessments, library guides, and course design templates.

Listed below are a few examples of the ways in which faculty, students, librarians, and instructional designers may use or support the adoption of open educational resources.

Faculty

Many faculty already use OER in their classes — for example, showing an openly licensed course video or using worksheets created and shared by other faculty. Faculty can create and share syllabi, lesson plans, and even entire textbooks for their courses. They can collaborate with faculty at their own institutions, or other institutions around the world. They can access and remix existing OER and re-publish them to share with others.

Students

Students can play a significant role in creating and improving OER ─ from simple assignments to full textbooks. One example from Plymouth State University includes students working together to find public-domain materials, write topic introductions, craft discussion forum prompts, and create assignments to go along with the materials to create a full OER textbook. The result became The Open Anthology of Early American Literature.

Librarians

Librarians play a key role in OER initiatives by advocating for, developing, exploring, and managing OER. Along with helping you find OER, librarians can help you better understand copyright and licensing concepts, and guide you through your Creative Commons licensing options if you choose to create materials yourself. You will explore this further in Chapter Four, Finding OER.

Instructional Designers

Instructional Designers can work with faculty and students to integrate OER into teaching and learning and also share and publish their course design templates as OER. Many instructional designers and technologists work with librarians and IT services to help integrate OER into learning management systems such as Blackboard, Canvas, and Brightspace.

Review of Open Licensing & OER

Going back to our definition, we need to remember that OER reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license permitting their free use and repurposing by others.

The most commonly used intellectual property license for OER that permits free use and re-purposing is called Creative Commons Licensing. Creative Commons licenses work with legal definitions of copyright to automatically provide usage rights pertaining to that work.

The next chapter will introduce Creative Commons licenses briefly, and later chapters will provide a more comprehensive overview, including how to license your own OER when you adapt or create.

A (Very) Brief History of Open Educational Resources

  • 1994 – Wayne Hodgins coined the term “learning object”
  • 1998 – David Wiley coined the phrase “open content”
  • 2001 – Larry Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred founded Creative Commons
  • 2001 – MIT introduced their OpenCourseWare project (MOOCs)
  • 2002 – UNESCO coined the term “Open Educational Resources” (OER).
  • 2012 – UNESCO adopted the 2012 OER Paris Declaration, an international commitment to OER
  • 2019 – UNESCO updates their definition of OER, creating conversation within the open community about the impact of this change on the ability to reuse OER

This movement continues to gain momentum, and the community of open education practitioners continues to expand. Educators around the world are increasing their use and creation of these resources in their teaching and learning.

Pressbooks Feature Alert!

The blue box below contains another example of H5P. There are over 50 different H5P codes you can build and embed into your book to help students engage more deeply with the content.

 

Concept Review

An interactive H5P element has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view it online here:
https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=62#h5p-4

Explore Further

Want to learn more about the history of OER?

Bliss, T. J. and Smith, M. (2017). A Brief History of Open Educational Resources. In: Jhangiani, R S and Biswas-Diener, R. (eds.) Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science. (pp. 9–27). London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/bbc.b.

Wiley, D. (2020, January 16). Clarifying and Strengthening the 5Rs.  Iterating Towards Openness: Pragmatism Before Zeal. https://opencontent.org/blog/archives/6271

3

Introduction to Open Licensing

Learning Objectives

This chapter will support learners in being able to: 

  • Define an open license
  • Distinguish between materials that are all rights reserved, in the public domain, and openly licensed
  • Identify the four factors of fair use

One or more interactive elements has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view them online here: https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=31#oembed-4

What is Copyright?

Copyright is a form of legal protection automatically provided to the authors of “original works of authorship,” including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works. Copyright in the U.S. is automatically assigned to creators of work, with no registration necessary.

It can be unlawful to use copyrighted works of others without their permission, and no permissions are granted in the case of All Rights Reserved (ARR) works. Activities such as copying, modifying, publicly displaying, publicly performing, and distributing copies of ARR work may be illegal unless permission is granted by the creator. U.S. copyright law generally gives the author/creator or owner of an original creative work an exclusive right to

  • Reproduce (copy) or distribute the original work to the public (e.g., create and sell copies of a film)
  • Create new works based upon the original work (e.g., make a movie based on a book)
  • Perform or display the work publicly (e.g., perform a play)

Violation of one of these rights is called copyright infringement. However, the use may be authorized by copyright limitations (such as fair use) described below.

What is Fair Use?

Start with an overview of fair use by viewing this short video:

One or more interactive elements has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view them online here: https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=31#oembed-5

Fair use is a copyright principle based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. Whether or not a specific use falls under Fair Use is determined by four factors:

  • the purpose and character of your use
  • the nature of the copyrighted work
  • the amount and substantiality of the portion taken, and
  • the effect of the use upon the potential market

Unfortunately, if the copyright owner disagrees with your fair use interpretation, the dispute may have to be resolved by a lawsuit or arbitration. If it’s not a fair use, then you are infringing upon the rights of the copyright owner and you may be putting yourself or the institution at risk. The only guidance for fair use is provided by a set of factors outlined in copyright law. These factors are weighed in each case to determine whether a use qualifies as a fair use.

Recognizing the differences between how copyrighted material and openly licensed or public domain material can be reused and shared legally, allows for a comprehensive understanding of the Fair Use principle.

Additional information on Fair Use and the TEACH Act can be found at the University of Texas Libraries – Crash Course on Copyright  website.

Understanding an Open License

In the previous chapter, you learned that an open educational resource is either in the public domain or released with copyright permissions which allows for free use and repurposing by others. Specifically, an open license exists as a way for the original creator to clearly inform others how their work can be used by granting permissions to share and adapt their work. A Public Domain license and the variety of open license permissions known as Creative Commons (CC) are the predominant standards for open licenses. You will learn more about the six different CC license permissions in Chapter 8.

 

This video, What Is An Open License and How Does it Work?, provides more information about the benefits of an open license and how this standard makes sharing and reusing resources easy.

One or more interactive elements has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view them online here: https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=31#oembed-6

What do the licenses mean?

It is the copyright status and license applied to a work which determine what you can and cannot do with the creative work of someone else. Knowing how to identify and differentiate between common types of copyright status will be useful when determining which content you may reuse, and how. One should assume that a work is all rights reserved, unless the creator explicitly states otherwise or the user of the work can prove it differently.

As you search for OER, you will become familiar with the markings of each license type.

 

Creative Commons License Spectrum
“Creative commons license spectrum” by Shaddim is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Click on each license code below to learn more about it.

Attribution: CC BY

Attribution-ShareAlike: CC BY-SA

Attribution-NoDerivs: CC BY-ND

Attribution-NonCommercial: CC BY-NC 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike: CC BY-NC-SA

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs: CC BY-NC-ND

You can find lots more information about open licensing and Creative Commons in Part Two of this book, While You’re Waiting.

4

A note about the Public Domain...

What is the Public Domain?

A public domain work is a creative work that is not protected by copyright, which means it’s free for you to use without permission. Works in the public domain are those for which intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, or are inapplicable.

Here are some examples of works in the public domain:

  • Material created by the US Government, such as pictures taken by NASA
  • Materials for which Copyright Protection has lapsed, such as “New Hampshire” by Robert Frost
  • Works released to the public domain when they were created, such as images on Pexels

Determining if a work is in the public domain can be difficult because the terms of copyright protection in the United States have changed over time. The Cornell University Library Copyright Information Center is a useful tool for understanding what works might fall into the public domain.

What is the Difference Between Public Domain and Open License?

They both grant free access to the materials, but the scope and nature are completely different.

Open licensing does recognize clear ownership of intellectual property and the work is still protected under copyright law, whereas works in the public domain are not protected by copyright law. Therefore, users are required to follow the license requirements when using openly licensed materials.

This infographic illustrates the differences between public domain, open license, and all rights reserved copyright.

Chart showing the difference between open license, public domain and all rights reserved copyright.
“Difference between open license, public domain and all rights reserved copyright” by Boyoung Chae is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Why Open Licensing Matters

The power of open licensing lies in its ability to clearly communicate how the creator intends the work to be used. A creator can explicitly share the work and control the licensing provisions while retaining ownership. Remember, for a work without a copyright notice, all rights reserved is assumed. So if you want to openly share your OER with your students and faculty peers, or publish it online for the world to access, displaying an open copyright license statement with the work ensures it will be easily and clearly adopted in the way you intend.

In Chapter 8 you will spend more time learning about the permissions behind the six different Creative Commons Licenses.  In that module, you will focus on distinguishing between the different permissions for adoption, adaptation, creation, attribution, and reuse. This module serves as an introduction and overview of copyright, fair use, public domain, and open licenses.

Concept Review

Fill in the blanks below using terms from the following list: copyright, copyleft, creative commons, public domain, permissions, attribution, fair use, openly licenses

(Disregard the need for capitalization)

 

An interactive H5P element has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view it online here:
https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=310#h5p-8

II

While You're Waiting...

While you’re waiting for your account to become active, continue on in this book so you can be ready to get started right away.

Part Two of the book will provide a deeper dive into Open Educational Resources (OER), including information on the following specific topics:

  • three types of OER use: adopt, adapt, create
  • where to find OER resources
  • more on CC licensing
  • now to choose a license for your new work!

6

Adopt/Adapt/Create

Shannon Moist and NSCC

Implementing OER

There are three ways to implement Open Educational Resources:

  • Adopt what is already available (as-is).
  • Adapt what is available to fit your own needs (customize).
  • Create your own!

Why adaptation or adoption?

Many educators feel driven to create the “perfect” resources for their classes and it can be difficult put aside that perfection and use other people’s creations. However, the number, variety, and quality of OER available freely is such that any educator should be able to find resources they can readily (with or without adaptations) put to use within their classrooms. And adaptation or adoption of OER will almost always be more efficient than creating teaching materials from scratch.

Jan M. Pawlowski addressed one of the reasons behind this reluctance in his article, Emotional Ownership as the Key to OER Adoption.

 

 

 

 

7

Adoption

The information in this chapter refers to adopting an open textbook but any OER (assignments, videos, lecture notes, diagrams, et cetera) can be adopted for classroom use (using many of the steps below).

Adopt an open textbook

Using an open textbook for your class

  1. Find the right textbook. Search in the repositories listed on our TCC OER Research Guide.
  2. Review and evaluate to see if it matches your criteria and based on content, presentation, online accessibility, production options, platform compatibility, delivery options, interactivity, consistency between online and printed versions, and available ancillary material (test banks, PowerPoints, etc.)
  3. Decide if you want to use as is or modify it. One of the benefits of open textbooks is flexibility to modify and customize them for specific course designs as much or as little as you desire. If you want to make edits or append content, make sure the Creative Commons license allows for that (every CC license except the non-derivative license allows for modifications).
  4. Distribute to your students. There are a number of ways in which you can do this.
    • If you’re using a textbook from Pressbooks, provide the link to the textbook to your students.
    • Alternatively, you can download copies of the book and put them on another site. Some examples of where you could put your own copies of the book files are:
      • Your institutional LMS (Learning Management System). Load the book files into Blackboard and make the books available to your students via the LMS.
      • Use an online file sharing service like Dropbox or Google Docs. Upload a copy of the book files to Dropbox or Google Docs and send your student the link to that copy.
      • If you have a faculty website, put copies of the files on that website and send students to your website to download your copy of the textbook.

Attribution

This chapter contains material from the B.C. Open Textbook Adoption Guide by BCcampus is used under a CC BY 4.0 International license. Download this book from free from http://open.bccampus.ca.

 

 

 

8

Adaptation

Adaptation

The term “adaptation” is commonly used to describe the process of making changes to an existing work. Though we can also replace “adapt” with revise, modify, alter, customize, or other synonym that describes the act of making a change. The example below refers to adapting an open textbook but any OER (assignments, videos, lecture notes, diagrams, etc) can be adapted.

In addition to cost savings to students, one of the biggest advantages of choosing an open textbook is it gives faculty the legal right to add to, adapt, or delete the content of the textbook to fit their specific course without obtaining permission from the copyright holder. This is possible because the copyright holder has already granted permission by releasing their work using an open — or Creative Commons — license. This type of license gives users permission to use and reuse, share, copy, retain and modify the textbook without consulting the author.

Below are some examples of how an open textbook can be adapted by adding in your own Learning Objectives, Exercises, and Key Takeaways.

Learning Objectives

Type your learning objectives here.

  • First
  • Second

Exercises

Type your exercises here.

  1. First
  2. Second

Key Takeaways

Type your key takeaways here.

  • First
  • Second

 

Reasons to adapt an open textbook

One of the benefits of using an openly licensed textbook or other educational resource is that you are free to adapt it to fit your needs. In other words, you can adjust the educational resources to fit your course curriculum, not the other way around.

Below are 10 more reasons adapting an open textbook might be for you:

  1. Address a particular teaching style or learning style
  2. Adjust for a different grade or course level
  3. Address diversity needs
  4. Meet a cultural, regional, or national preference
  5. Make the material more accessible for people with disabilities
  6. Add material contributed by students or material suggested by students
  7. Translate the material into another language
  8. Correct errors or inaccuracies
  9. Update the book with current information
  10. Add more media or links to other resources

Attributions

This chapter contains material from the B.C. Open Textbook Adaptation Guide by BCcampus is used under a CC BY 4.0 International license. Download this book from free from http://open.bccampus.ca.
The “Reasons” above are adapted from fromWikiEducator. “Adapt” in OER Handbook for Educators (http://wikieducator.org/OER_Handbook/educator_version_one/Adapt) and Why Remix Open Educational Resources? created by Liam Green-Hughes, both used under a CC BY license.

9

Creative Commons Licensing

Choose a license

If you are adapting an existing open textbook, the adaptations you make will be released with whatever open license you choose, while the rest of the book will be released under the license of the original book. In other words, you need to respect the license of the original work. You cannot license what you do not create. You can only attach a CC BY (Creative Commons Attribution), or other open license to the parts of the book that you have created and are new.

However, there is a “catch.” If the textbook you are adapting has a Share-Alike condition (CC BY-SA 4.0) stipulated, then you must release the entire book using the same license as the original book.

Below are the symbols and definitions of each of the Creative Commons licenses. If you are unsure which CC license you would like to use, you can use the Creative Commons Choose a License tool.

creative-commons-783531_1280

Attribution: CC BY

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

Attribution-ShareAlike: CC BY-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

Attribution-NoDerivs: CC BY-ND

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

Attribution-NonCommercial: CC BY-NC 

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike: CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs: CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

Attributions

The Creative Commons license definitions and images listed on this page have been copied from Creative Commons and are used under a CC BY 4.0 license.

10

Combining CC Licenses

Combining CC licenses

When adapting an open textbook (or other OER), you may want to incorporate other people’s works into your adaptation. In order to do that, you must ensure that any existing licenses on the work you’re adapting or including are compatible with each other.

For example, as explained in Chapter 9, the CC BY license is the least restrictive and is compatible with all of the other CC licenses. However, if you want to include a work that has a CC BY-SA license, you must use that same license with your adaptation (which may conflict with other licenses already attached to the work). Creative Commons provides more information about CC BY-SA license compatibility on this page.

      

For further help, you can use the use the Creative Commons Choose a License tool or the Wiki/cc license compatibility chart  (pictured below), or contact one of TCC’s OER Librarians.

Creative Commons License Compatibility Chart
This is a license compatibility chart when you want to combine or mix two CC licensed works. Created by Kennisland published under a CC0 license.

 

Attribution

The Creative Commons license definitions and images listed on this page have been copied from Creative Commons and are used under a CC BY 4.0 license.

11

Attribution Statements

Attributions

Regardless of the Creative Commons license you choose for your OER, all CC licenses require at least an attribution to the original creator of the work (the “BY” part of a CC license). Below are some examples of how to create attribution statements for text and media.

This attribution generator from Open Washington can also be a useful tool. Creative Commons also has advice about and examples of giving attribution.

Examples of attribution statements

All Creative Commons licenses contain an attribution (BY) clause. This means that you must include a statement that gives credit to, or attributes, the creator of the work from which you have borrowed, whether it’s text, an image, a video, or other item. If you have made a change, indicate that in your attribution statement.

As far as how and where to place attribution statements for text or media taken from another source or sources, best practices state that you should place them at the bottom of each affected web page. Clearly mark all of these with a heading called: “Attributions”. Several attribution statements can be listed under this heading. Here are examples.

Example of an attribution statement for adapted text

This chapter is an adaptation of Natural Disasters and Human Impacts (on Open Geography Education) by R. Adam Dastrup and Maura Hahnenberger, and is used under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International license.

Note:

  • The statement is clear, simple, and contains all elements required for a complete attribution: title of the work used, author(s), and license type. A link is provided to the original work, the home page of the website (this is optional), and the license type.
  • There is no need to name the adapting author in this statement. This information should either be included on the Book Info page as a main author OR if you want to indicate which author wrote/adapted which chapter, you can use the Chapter Author option at the bottom of each chapter/web page in Pressbooks.
  • If the book is to be CC BY licensed, then you will need to address the conditions dictated by the license for each resource you are using in your adaptation.  At the bottom of the Chapter page in Pressbooks, there is an option to set the license type for that page which will override, for this page only, the overarching license chosen for the book on the Book Info page.
  • If the chapter contains some original material AND some material from another source, then rather than saying “This chapter is an adaptation of….”, say “This chapter contains material taken from….”.

Example of an attribution statement for an adapted image

Figure 1.2
Dog by David Locke is used under a CC BY 2.0 license. Modifications to this photo include cropping.

Note:

  • The statement is clear, simple and contains all elements required for a complete attribution: title of the image, photographer, and license type, as well as a note of the changes made. A link is provided to the original work, the home page of the photographer (if available), and the license type.

Attributions

This chapter contains material from the BC Open Textbook Adaptation Guide by BCcampus and is used under a CC BY 4.0 international license. Download this book for free at http://open.bccampus.ca.

III

Using Pressbooks

Once you have access to Pressbooks, Part Three will provide the information and guidance you need to get started on your own projects.  It includes:

  • Get Inspired! – See what’s possible and explore the Pressbooks Directory
  • Get Started! – Creating a new book from scratch, cloning a book, importing content
  • Get a Little Fancy! – Import media, insert footnotes, and create active glossary terms
  • Get Interactive! – Add H5P and activate Hypothesis within your book to facilitate online annotation

12

Get Inspired!

PressbooksEdu is more than just a place to build books full of rich media and dynamic content; it’s a whole network of cataloged books in curated collections, many of which are openly licensed so you can pull them – whole or in part –  into our network to customize and make them perfect for your course! PressbooksEDU includes a number of education-specific features.

Check out some great examples of Pressbooks’ built in features in action!

Pressbooks Feature Alert!

Below is another example of H5P (Accordian)

An interactive H5P element has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view it online here:
https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=81#h5p-9

 

Now search the Pressbooks Directory to see if there’s a book you’d want to adopt or adapt for use with your students!

While you can import openly licensed content from anywhere, if you find a book on any Pressbooks platform that seems fairly close to what you want for your students, you can easily clone it and get started customizing right away!

13

Get Started!

You can create books in Pressbooks in a few different ways:

  1. You can use the “Create a New Book” command (very top menu of your Pressbooks Dashboard).
    Screenshot showing the options under the My Books menuThen you can:
    • Start typing your content or pasting it from elsewhere.
    • Add chapters and parts as needed using the menu on the left side (under Organize).
    • Use the Import tool (left side menu under Tools) to bring content in from a variety of different places.
      screenshot of content import tools
      You can click the image above to see text more clearly; then use your browser’s back button to return to the book page.
  2. You can use the “Clone A Book” command (very top menu of your Pressbooks Dashboard) to bring an openly licensed book on the Pressbooks platform into our network & customize as you’d like.

Consider mixing the very best of all three options…start by cloning a book, and then add your own original material and/or import from other openly licensed sources!

 

14

Get a Little Fancy!

Add Media, Footnotes, and Glossary Terms

Make your textbook more visually appealing AND a more effective teaching resource by adding multimedia, clickable footnotes, and active glossary terms!

Add Media

Adding Images:

You can add images at the point of need, or you can add them all at once to the Media Library.

Screen capture showing where to add images.

You can learn more about adding and working with images in the Pressbooks User Guide.  Prefer to watch? Here’s a short video on Adding and Editing Images in Pressbooks.

Adding Videos

We’ve found that the easiest way to add videos to a book is to paste the embed code into the text editor. Follow these steps:

  1. Copy the embed code from the source. (In YouTube, this is found in the SHARE options below the video.)
  2. In your book, place your cursor where you want to add the video.
  3. Click the Text tab in the upper right hand corner of editing screen to switch to the ‘code view.’ (screen capture of this below)
  4. Use Ctrl + V to paste the video embed code.

Screen capture showing where the text editor is located.

Adding Audio

Audio files can be added individually or put together as a playlist.  Follow the same steps as when adding images – either using the Add Media button above your editing dashboard or the main chapter menu to the left. A title and player controls will be included with the found file, and these can be adjusted when uploaded or later.

For more on embedding multimedia, see the Pressbooks User Guide, or watch this short video: PressbooksEDU: Embed Video, Audio & Multimedia


Add Footnotes

Adding linked footnotes like this is easy!

  1. Place your cursor where you want to add a footnote.
  2. Click on FN in the editing tools.
  3. Enter what the text that will appear at the bottom of the page as the footnote and click OK.

Pressbooks Feature Alert!

The image slider below, used to provide visual instructions for adding footnotes, is another example of H5P.

 

An interactive H5P element has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view it online here:
https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=86#h5p-10


Adding Glossary Terms

Pressbooks allows you to easily provide definitions for key words & phrases in your book by activating a pop up when clicked. You can create them using the Glossary Terms menu to the left in the Organize menu. (Steps to complete this are shown in the screen capture below.) 

 

Screen capture showing how to add glossary terms
You can click on the image above to see the text more clearly; use your browser’s back button to return to the book.

Glossary terms can also be added on-the-fly when editing a chapter, using the editor’s tools above the content.  Highlight the word or phrase you want to define and click GL on the chapter menu – located above the chapter content.  You’ll have the option to type the definition (in the Description field) or select one that has already been added (found by clicking the Choose Existing Term tab.  (Screen capture below.)

Screen capture showing how to add a glossary term from within the chapter.

You can also choose to include a glossary list at the end of your book.

  1. Click Add Back Matter from the Organize menu (left towards the top).
  2. Give this new section a title.
  3. Using the Back Matter Type pull down menu, select glossary.
  4. Notice the message that pops up telling you to leave the content area blank. (It will be auto-filled with every glossary term entered, either before or after the section is created.)
  5. Click create, and the glossary will be ready!
Screen capture showing how to include a glossary at the end of the book.
You can click on the image above to see the text more clearly; use your browsers back button to return to the book.

 

This is an example of a footnote.

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Get Interactive!

What is H5P?

H5P is a popular plugin used to create exciting, interactive content on the web. In Pressbooks, it’s mostly used to create interactive quizzes and other activities in open textbooks and other open educational resources.

There are many different types of content enabled by H5P. You’ve already seen a few in action throughout earlier chapters in this book. You can view examples of them and detailed instructions for creating different types on the H5P website (Note: they offer different installation and embedding options, but that’s all taken care of by Pressbooks – you just need to think of the exciting things you can create!)

You can also check out The H5P Pressbooks Kitchen created by BC Campus! This contains many examples and support information, as well as community engagement regarding H5P.

Activating H5P

Before getting started, your first need to activate the H5P plugin on your book. This can be done under “Plugins” on the left menu.

Adding H5P activities

Once the plugin is active, follow these steps to add an H5P element to your book:

  1. Navigate to the H5P Content menu and select “Add New.”
  2. Enter a title.
  3. Select content type from the dropdown menu.
  4. Install the content type by clicking on “Get” and following the steps indicated (if necessary).
  5. Enter the information for your quiz/activity etc.
  6. Click on “Create” when you’re done!

Now that you’ve created your element, you can add it to your chapter. To do so:

  1. Copy the shortcode displayed in the top right of the screen.
  2. Navigate to the chapter where you would like add the element.
  3. Paste the shortcode into place (you can do this in the visual editor, no need to switch to text).
  4. Save your chapter.
  5. View the web version to see the element in action.
  6. Export other desired formats to see the fallback message.

You can also add an H5P element that you had previously created by placing your cursor where you want it to appear in the chapter and clicking Add H5P above your content tools.

See the H5P Interactive Content chapter in the Pressbooks User Guide for more information, including an example of how to create a simple multiple choice question.

Prefer to watch and learn? Check out this video tutorial: 

One or more interactive elements has been excluded from this version of the text. You can view them online here: https://open.ocolearnok.org/tccoerlibrarian/?p=448#oembed-2


Enable annotation in the webbook version of your project using Hypothesis

Hypothesis is a powerful web annotation tool that many users deploy to enable collaboration between authors and editors, personal note taking and annotation, engagement with readers, or use as a teaching tool with students. This section will cover:

  • What is Hypothesis?
  • How to enable Hypothesis on your webbook
  • How to include and exclude specific chapters or sections from Hypothesis

What is Hypothesis?

Hypothesis is a simple web annotation tool that allows readers to highlight and annotate webpages, enabling deeper engagement with content. While the tool is available as a browser extension that can be used on any webpage, Pressbooks allows you to build its capabilities into the pages of your webbook itself,  meaning readers can read and create annotations without installing the extension (so long as they have a Hypothesis account) and public comments will be visible to anyone who comes to your book.

Once Hypothesis is enabled on your webbook (see below), any reader coming to the book will see the Hypothesis toolbar on the right, either open or minimized depending on your settings.

An example of a webbook with Hypothesis enabled.
An example of a webbook with Hypothesis enabled. Click to view it larger; use your browser’s back button to return to this page in the book.

With this toolbar open, the reader will see any public annotations and can create or log into their account. Once logged in, they can select any section of text and a small icon will pop up that lets them either highlight the passage (which will remain private) or add an annotation. Annotations can be edited, deleted, replied to or shared using the icons at the bottom of the annotation section.

These annotations can also be public, private to a reader or in a private group, and the user can toggle between these options at the very top of the toolbar (the default is “Public”). You can read more about creating groups and annotating in groups on the Hypothesis website.

NOTE: If you have your book set to “Private,” you don’t need to create a group to keep your annotations and replies hidden from public view. The Pressbooks privacy setting means that no one can access the book, and as such they can’t see any of the Hypothesis activity on it by default.

Options using Hypothesis Tool
An example of a webbook showing Hypothesis in action. Click to view it larger; use your browser’s back button to return to this page in the book.

Enabling Hypothesis in a Pressbooks book

By default, Hypothesis will not appear on any pages of your webbook. To enable it, follow these steps:

  1. Go to “Settings” -> “Hypothesis” in your book
  2. Select your default behaviors for:
    1. Displaying highlights
    2. Displaying the sidebar (you can make it open by default if you wish)
    3. Enabling annotations on PDFs stored in your media library (NOTE: we discourage the use of your media library for this kind of storage)
  3. Select the parts of your book on which to allow Hypothesis annotations.
  4. Save your changes.

Screen capture showing Hypothesis setting options

Including & Excluding Specific Chapters or Sections

Your Hypothesis settings also offer granular control over which chapters or sections have Hypothesis enabled. To employ this option, you will need the post ID for the chapter(s) or section(s) you wish to specify. To find this, when you are in the chapter editor, look in the address bar for post=[a number].

Once you have this number, you can enter it in the Hypothesis content settings in the appropriate field to allow or disallow Hypothesis on that specific page, overriding the global settings.

NOTE: If you’re entering more than one post ID, separate them with a comma only (no spaces!).

A screen capture showing Hypothesis settings for activating it only in certain chapters, parts, or sections.

Uses

  • Collaborative editing – users can set up a private group, leave comments and editing suggestions, and discuss changes right in the document.
  • Reader feedback – if you’re sharing your book with early readers, they can offer feedback and comments, or you can leave the option open to anyone who is engaging with your books!
  • Student engagement – students can be encouraged to engage with academic texts or books being discussed in class by leaving their thoughts and talking about the text among the class, offering those less likely to speak up in class the opportunity to share their thoughts.

16

Additional Resources:

OCO Pressbooks Resources: https://wke.lt/w/s/lvhHe3

Links Shared during the Advanced Pressbooks Publishing workshop on 10/21/20: https://wke.lt/w/s/UvAKIQ

H5P Resources: https://wke.lt/w/s/HdfE8o

1

Glossary

CC BY

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

CC BY-NC

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

CC BY-ND

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

CC BY-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

H5P

H5P is an abbreviation for HTML5 Package; aims to make it easy for everyone to create, share and reuse interactive HTML5 content. (definition from Wikipedia)

Open OCO

Our access to Pressbooks is provided in part through OSRHE's Online Consortium of Oklahoma; Open OCO is the official name for the Online Consortium of OK Press

2

A few final thoughts...

When you create a book in OCO’s Pressbooks platform, an OER Librarian will be automatically added to your book as a collaborator.  This will allow for more streamlined support when you need it!

We are planning to build additional sections in the appendix, which will provide an ever-growing supply of resources to help and guide you, but sometimes you’ll run into something that just isn’t working as expected.  In that case, don’t hesitate to email oerlibrarian@tulsacc.edu!  Someone from the team will be in touch as soon as possible!